Configuring

Config Files

Configuration values are stored in JSON files.

  • Global config file (~/.ionic/config.json): for global CLI config and auth
  • Project config files (ionic.config.json): for Ionic project config

The CLI provides commands for setting and printing config values from project config files and the global CLI config file. See ionic config set --help and ionic config get --help for usage.

Integrations

Integrations such as Cordova are automatically activated when detected, but can be easily disabled.

Integrations hook into CLI events. For example, when the Cordova integration is enabled, ionic cordova prepare will run after ionic build runs. See Hooks.

integration enabled when… disabled with…
Cordova ionic cordova commands are run ionic config set integrations.cordova.enabled false
Gulp gulp exists in devDependencies of your package.json ionic config set integrations.gulp.enabled false

Environment Variables

The CLI will look for the following environment variables:

  • IONIC_CONFIG_DIRECTORY: The directory of the global CLI config. Defaults to ~/.ionic.
  • IONIC_HTTP_PROXY: Set a URL for proxying all CLI requests through. See Using a Proxy. The CLI will also look for HTTP_PROXY and HTTPS_PROXY, both of which npm use.
  • IONIC_EMAIL / IONIC_PASSWORD: For automatic login via environment variables.

Flags

CLI flags are global options that alter the behavior of a CLI command.

  • --help: Instead of running the command, view its help page.
  • --verbose: Show all log messages for debugging purposes.
  • --quiet: Only show WARN and ERROR log messages.
  • --no-interactive: Turn off interactive prompts and fancy outputs. If a CI server is detected (we use ci-info), the CLI is automatically non-interactive.
  • --confirm: Turn on auto-confirmation of confirmation prompts. Careful: the CLI prompts before doing something potentially harmful. Auto-confirming may have unintended results.

Hooks

CLI hooks are how you can run scripts during CLI events, such as “watch” and “build”. To hook into the CLI, use the following npm scripts in your package.json file:

npm script commands
ionic:watch:before ionic serve, ionic cordova run -l, ionic cordova emulate -l
ionic:build:before ionic build, ionic upload, ionic package build, ionic cordova build, ionic cordova run, ionic cordova emulate
ionic:build:after ionic build, ionic upload, ionic package build, ionic cordova build, ionic cordova run, ionic cordova emulate

Example

  "scripts": {
    "ionic:build:before": "cp somefile www/somefile",
  }

Note: If you use gulp, the CLI will run gulp tasks by the same name as the npm scripts above.

Service Proxies

The CLI can add proxies to the HTTP server for “livereload” commands like ionic serve and ionic cordova run android -lc. These proxies are useful if you are developing in the browser and you need to make calls to an external API. With this feature you can proxy requests to the external API through the Ionic CLI, which prevents the No 'Access-Control-Allow-Origin' header is present on the requested resource error.

In the ionic.config.json file you can add a property with an array of proxies you want to add. The proxies are an object with the following properties:

  • path: string that will be matched against the beginning of the incoming request URL.
  • proxyUrl: a string with the url of where the proxied request should go.
  • proxyNoAgent: (optional) true/false, if true opts out of connection pooling, see HttpAgent
{
  "name": "appname",
  "app_id": "",
  "type": "ionic-angular",
  "proxies": [
    {
      "path": "/v1",
      "proxyUrl": "https://api.instagram.com/v1"
    }
  ]
}

Using the above configuration, you can now make requests to your local server at http://localhost:8100/v1 to have it proxy out requests to https://api.instagram.com/v1.

Note: Don’t forget to change the URLs being requested in your app to the local URL. Also, the “livereload” command must be restarted for the proxy configuration to take effect.

Using a Proxy

To proxy HTTP requests performed by the CLI, you will need to install the CLI proxy plugin in the same node_modules context as the Ionic CLI:

For CLI installed globally:

$ npm install -g @ionic/cli-plugin-proxy

For CLI installed locally:

$ cd myProject # cd into your project's directory
$ npm install --save-exact --save-dev @ionic/cli-plugin-proxy

Then, use one of the following environment variables:

$ export HTTP_PROXY="http://proxy.example.com:8888" # also used by npm
$ export HTTPS_PROXY="https://proxy.example.com:8888" # also used by npm
$ export IONIC_HTTP_PROXY="http://proxy.example.com:8888"

Other CLIs

Each CLI that you use must be configured separately to proxy network requests.

npm

$ npm config set proxy http://proxy.company.com:8888
$ npm config set https-proxy https://proxy.company.com:8888

git

$ git config --global http.proxy http://proxy.example.com:8888

SSL Configuration

You can configure the Ionic CLI’s SSL (similar to configuring npm CLI):

$ ionic config set -g ssl.cafile /path/to/cafile # file path to your CA root certificate
$ ionic config set -g ssl.certfile /path/to/certfile # file path to a client certificate
$ ionic config set -g ssl.keyfile /path/to/keyfile # file path to a client key file

The cafile, certfile, and keyfile entries can be manually edited as arrays of strings in ~/.ionic/config.json to include multiple files.

API

Native

General