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The Ionic Page handles registering and displaying specific pages based on URLs. It's used underneath NavController so it will never have to be interacted with directly. When a new page is pushed with NavController, the URL is updated to match the path to this page.

Unlike traditional web apps, URLs don't dictate navigation in Ionic apps. Instead, URLs help us link to specific pieces of content as a breadcrumb. The current URL gets updated as we navigate, but we use the NavController push and pop, or NavPush and NavPop to move around. This makes it much easier to handle complicated nested navigation.

We refer to our URL system as a deep link system instead of a router to encourage Ionic developers to think of URLs as a breadcrumb rather than as the source of truth in navigation. This encourages flexible navigation design and happy apps all over the world.

Usage

The first step to setting up deep links is to add the page that should be a deep link in the IonicPageModule.forChild import of the page's module. For our examples, this will be MyPage:

@NgModule({
  declarations: [
    MyPage
  ],
  imports: [
    IonicPageModule.forChild(MyPage)
  ],
  entryComponents: [
    MyPage
  ]
})
export class MyPageModule {}

Then, add the @IonicPage decorator to the component. The most simple usage is adding an empty decorator:

@IonicPage()
@Component({
  templateUrl: 'main.html'
})
export class MyPage {}

This will automatically create a link to the MyPage component using the same name as the class, name: 'MyPage'. The page can now be navigated to by using this name. For example:

@Component({
  templateUrl: 'another-page.html'
})
export class AnotherPage {
  constructor(public navCtrl: NavController) {}

  goToMyPage() {
    // go to the MyPage component
    this.navCtrl.push('MyPage');
  }
}

The @IonicPage decorator accepts a DeepLinkMetadataType object. This object accepts the following properties: name, segment, defaultHistory, and priority. All of them are optional but can be used to create complex navigation links.

Changing Name

As mentioned previously, the name property will be set to the class name if it isn't provided. Changing the name of the link is extremely simple. To change the name used to link to the component, simply pass it in the decorator like so:

@IonicPage({
  name: 'my-page'
})

This will create a link to the MyPage component using the name 'my-page'. Similar to the previous example, the page can be navigated to by using the name:

goToMyPage() {
  // go to the MyPage component
  this.navCtrl.push('my-page');
}

Setting URL Path

The segment property is used to set the URL to the page. If this property isn't provided, the segment will use the value of name. Since components can be loaded anywhere in the app, the segment doesn't require a full URL path. When a page becomes the active page, the segment is appended to the URL.

The segment can be changed to anything and doesn't have to match the name. For example, passing a value for name and segment:

@IonicPage({
  name: 'my-page',
  segment: 'some-path'
})

When navigating to this page as the first page in the app, the URL will look something like:

http://localhost:8101/#/some-path

However, navigating to the page will still use the name like the previous examples do.

The segment property is useful for creating dynamic links. Sometimes the URL isn't known ahead of time, so it can be passed as a variable.

Since passing data around is common practice in an app, it can be reflected in the app's URL by using the :param syntax. For example, set the segment in the @IonicPage decorator:

@IonicPage({
  name: 'detail-page',
  segment: 'detail/:id'
})

In this case, when we push to a new instance of 'detail-page', the value of id will in the detailInfo data being passed to push will replace :id in the URL.

Important: The property needs to be something that can be converted into a string, objects are not supported.

For example, to push the 'detail-page' in the ListPage component, the following code could be used:

@IonicPage({
  name: 'list'
})
export class ListPage {
  constructor(public navCtrl: NavController) {}

  pushPage(detailInfo) {
    // Push an `id` to the `'detail-page'`
    this.navCtrl.push('detail-page', {
      'id': detailInfo.id
    })
  }
}

If the value of detailInfo.id is 12, for example, the URL would end up looking like this:

http://localhost:8101/#/list/detail/12

Since this id will be used to pull in the data of the specific detail page, it's Important that the id is unique.

Note: Even though the name is detail-page, the segment uses detail/:id, and the URL will use the segment.

Default History

Pages can be navigated to using deep links from anywhere in the app, but sometimes the app is launched from a URL and the page needs to have the same history as if it were navigated to from inside of the app.

By default, the page would be navigated to as the first page in the stack with no prior history. A good example is the App Store on iOS. Clicking on a URL to an application in the App Store will load the details of the application with no back button, as if it were the first page ever viewed.

The default history of any page can be set in the defaultHistory property. This history will only be used if the history doesn't already exist, meaning if you navigate to the page the history will be the pages that were navigated from.

The defaultHistory property takes an array of strings. For example, setting the history of the detail page to the list page where the name is list:

@IonicPage({
  name: 'detail-page',
  segment: 'detail/:id',
  defaultHistory: ['list']
})

In this example, if the app is launched at http://localhost:8101/#/detail/my-detail the displayed page will be the 'detail-page' with an id of my-detail and it will show a back button that goes back to the 'list' page.

An example of an application with a set history stack is the Instagram application. Opening a link to an image on Instagram will show the details for that image with a back button to the user's profile page. There is no "right" way of setting the history for a page, it is up to the application.

Priority

The priority property is only used during preloading. By default, preloading is turned off so setting this property would do nothing. Preloading eagerly loads all deep links after the application boots instead of on demand as needed. To enable preloading, set preloadModules in the main application module config to true:

@NgModule({
  declarations: [
    MyApp
  ],
  imports: [
    BrowserModule,
    IonicModule.forRoot(MyApp, {
      preloadModules: true
    })
  ],
  bootstrap: [IonicApp],
  entryComponents: [
    MyApp
  ]
})
export class AppModule { }

If preloading is turned on, it will load the modules based on the value of priority. The following values are possible for priority: "high", "low", and "off". When there is no priority, it will be set to "low".

All deep links with their priority set to "high" will be loaded first. Upon completion of loading the "high" priority modules, all deep links with a priority of "low" (or no priority) will be loaded. If the priority is set to "off" the link will not be preloaded. Setting the priority is as simple as passing it to the @IonicPage decorator:

@IonicPage({
  name: 'my-page',
  priority: 'high'
})

We recommend setting the priority to "high" on the pages that will be viewed first when launching the application.

API

Native

General